Bob Iger, CEO of Disney, openly recognizes: they have stolen a movie, and the hackers call for a rescue to avoid its diffusion. Iger, whose complaint has been published Hollywood Reporter, has not wanted to reveal the name of the film, but has ensured that the company will not pay for the ransom. The studio is collaborating on a federal investigation to find the attackers and be able to check if the film is already in cyberspace.

Iger has organized a meeting with several of his employees in New York to publicize the robbery. The stolen title is not known, but the hypotheses point to the last release of Pirates of the Caribbean, whose premiere is scheduled for Friday in the United States, or to the third film of Cars, that would have to make debut in cinemas the 16 of June.

As usual, hackers ask for a quantity, which they have not specified, but it is known that this is a high figure in bitcoins. At first they threaten to release five minutes of the film and let go 20 minutes gradually until payment is made.

With the advent of subscription-based video consumer platforms, the film industry has seen piracy dwindling, but has given way to theft of securities as a measure of extortion. A few weeks ago, Netflix was victim of a similar technique. They refused to pay and now 10 episodes of the upcoming season of Orange is the New Black are ready to be downloaded at The Pirate Bay. The premiere was scheduled for June 9.

In December 2014 hackers attacked Sony Studios. The FBI accused North Korea of being behind such action. In this case has not yet transcended any possible author.

LEAVE A REPLY